Novalis


The exterior is an interior that has been raised to a mysterious state –/ (Perhaps the converse as well.) The organ is the integral and differential of these opposed infinite mysteries –yet simultaneously the homogenizing principle — the reciprocal realizing principle — the measure of both — or their function in general. One can also call it: the principle for raising it to a higher power — insofar as mystery is the state of diginity — relative dignity — relative mystery. The organ is that which separates — conceals — veils — isolates. On the other hand, indirectness strengthens directness. The more perfectly one side isolates, the more perfectly the other unites — the more in harmony. (Souls harmonize insofar as the organs come into contact with one another.)

(No connection without separation.

Contact is both separation and connection.)

The two of them become separated and connected by means of a third.

Entry 295 from Novalis’ Notes for a Romantic Encyclopaedia. David W. Wood, trans. (Albany: 2007.)

…. Our (modern) history has antiquity at the end — our (older) history, at the beginning …

Excerpt of entry 99 from Novalis’ Notes for a Romantic Encyclopaedia. David W. Wood, trans. (Albany: 2007.)

Is an organ already a higher unity of substances and motions? — a composed, effective and variable substance?

– Entry 94 from Novalis’ Notes for a Romantic Encyclopaedia. David W. Wood, trans. (Albany: 2007.)

…. Organology is a genuine auxiliary science of chemistry….

Excerpt of entry 90 from Novalis’ Notes for a Romantic Encyclopaedia. David W. Wood, trans. (Albany: 2007.)

A limb as such cannot be conceived as being idle. According to its concept, an organ is in movement. Therefore, it is partly directly connected with its stimulus, and partly indirectly, via the product. A corpse conceived in a dead fashion wouldn’t yield information about the force and its connection with the body. Observe the living organ and the limb in movement.

Entry 453 from Novalis’ Notes for a Romantic Encyclopaedia. David W. Wood, trans. (Albany: 2007.)

What is actually old? What is young?

Young — where the future prevails.

Old — where the past predominates.

Young and old — polar predicates of the historical substance. (Accidents are always polar.)

No antiquity, without juvenility — and vice versa.

Old corresponds to rigidity.

Young corresponds to fluidity.

The old, is the formed — plastic.

The young, is the mobile — common.

Excerpt of entry 97 from Novalis’ Notes for a Romantic Encyclopaedia. David W. Wood, trans. (Albany: 2007.)